Often, affected people need to tell their story in order to show the significance and scope of the German Cooperation with Afghanistan.

Take the women in Mazar-e Sharif, who work in a newly constructed bakery training centre where they offer delicious baked goods and pass on their knowledge to other bakers. New recipes, baking techniques and marketing opportunities are on the agenda. In this way, the women can contribute to their families’ income and have a job that they like.

Or, take the policewoman that can live up to her own expectations thanks to a literacy course. Today, she can write complaints, document violations of the law and forward them to the appropriate authorities all by herself. In this way, she supports women in particular to make use of their rights.

These stories give a face to the German Cooperation with Afghanistan. We have collected impressive stories showcasing people whose lives have been significantly influenced thanks to the German Cooperation’s activities in Afghanistan.

Filter

Results 5
We can watch the news on television and know what’s happening in our country.
Dust hangs in the air. Clouds of mist descend from the mountains upon the clay-coloured slopes, repeatedly shrouding the power line that snakes tirelessly through the landscape.
Since we have the new water supply, I have not received sick notes because of vomiting or diarrhoea anymore.
It is a sunny morning at Farida Balkh School in Balkh’s provincial capital Mazar-e Sharif. About 4,000 pupils from the city go to school here every day. The children in the schoolyard look healthy and eager to learn. But that was not always the case.
Our landscape is changing and becoming greener.
In 2010, the German government supported the construction of a small-scale hydropower plant in the village of Farghambol in the northern Afghan province of Badakhshan. The plant, which has a capacity of 280 kilowatts, supplies energy to 20,000 people. Its impact has been life-changing.
Electricity paves the way for development. Life is difficult without electricity.
The sky is blue and the sun is shining on the desert that is located close to the city Khulm in northern Afghanistan’s Balkh province. New shapes of power supply lines, transformers and masts start appearing. A modern electrical substation takes form. The station converts the high voltage of 220...
The farmers at the upper end of the channel get 30 minutes of water at a time and those at the lower end get 50 minutes – and that happens several times a day.
Mahsel gazes with satisfaction at the masses of water pouring out of the Amu Darya River into the new Baladory irrigation channel. The irrigation system starts at the flood control barrier in Shamaq village in Baghlan Province and extends 22 kilometres downriver. Around 5,000 farmers working a...